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Quantumaniac is where it’s at - and by ‘it’ I mean awesome.

Over here, I post a ton of astronomy / math / general science in an attempt to make your brain feel good. My aim is to be as informative as possible, while posting fascinating things that hopefully enlighten us both a little to the mysteries of our truly wondrous universe(s?). Plus, how would you know if the blog exists or not unless you observe it?

Boom, just pulled the Schrödinger’s cat card. Now you have to check it out - trust me, it said so in an equation somewhere.

Also, please check out my web design company - O8 Labs

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fouriestseries:

Atomic Models

Evidence-based theories on the structure of atoms have been around since the early 1800s. Dalton’s billiard ball model was the first on the map, and with further discoveries and experiments — like Thompson’s discovery of the electron and Rutherford’s gold foil experiment — improved models of atomic structure were introduced.

The first GIF above shows Rutherford’s planetary model, which was proposed in 1911. In his model, negatively-charged electrons orbit an incredibly small, dense nucleus of positive charge. Despite being a completely incorrect model, most people still think this is what atoms really look like*. This is not an atom. It’s physically impossible for electrons to stably orbit like this, and the idea of orbiting electrons was entirely replaced by 1926.

I can’t say what an atom actually looks like, but the most accurate model we have today is governed by the laws of quantum mechanics. The location of an electron is determined by a probability distribution, called an atomic orbital, which tells us the probability of an electron existing in any specific region around a nucleus. The second image shows the surface around a hydrogen nucleus on which an excited electron is most likely to exist.

Mathematica code posted here.

*Advertisements and popular science articles incorrectly represent atoms all the time. Even the US Atomic Energy Commission and the International Atomic Energy Agency use the Rutherford model in their logos!

spaceplasma:

The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is the world’s largest and most powerful particle collider, built by the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). The LHC is designed to answer some of the most profound questions about the universe: What is the origin of mass? Why are we made of matter and not antimatter? What is dark matter made of? It could also provide important new clues about conditions in the very early universe, when the four forces of nature were rolled into one giant superforce.

  • For more information click: here

Credit: Michael Hirst

ohstarstuff:

Spanning 4,000 light-years across, NGC 206 is the richest star cloud in M31 as well as one of the largest and brightest star formation regions of the Local Group. Also known as Andromeda, M31 is a spiral galaxy just 2.5 million light-years away. NGC 206 is near top center in this gorgeous close-up of the southwestern extent of Andromeda’s disk. The bright, blue stars of NGC 206 indicate its youth. In fact, its youngest massive stars are less than 10 million years old. 

ohstarstuff:

Spanning 4,000 light-years across, NGC 206 is the richest star cloud in M31 as well as one of the largest and brightest star formation regions of the Local Group. Also known as Andromeda, M31 is a spiral galaxy just 2.5 million light-years away. NGC 206 is near top center in this gorgeous close-up of the southwestern extent of Andromeda’s disk. The bright, blue stars of NGC 206 indicate its youth. In fact, its youngest massive stars are less than 10 million years old. 

dharbin:

FEYNMAN.
A “Persons Of Interest” drawing. You can get your own here, as my schedule allows, and see all the ones thus far here. Short version is I’ll draw any famous/widely recognizable figure, fictional or historical or just popular, just once.

dharbin:

FEYNMAN.

A “Persons Of Interest” drawing. You can get your own here, as my schedule allows, and see all the ones thus far here. Short version is I’ll draw any famous/widely recognizable figure, fictional or historical or just popular, just once.

matthen:

Unrolling these circles fills a triangle with base 2 π r and height r (where r is the radius of the filled disk). Such a triangle has area π r². This does not serve as a complete proof for why this is the area of a circle, but can give you some intuition for why it should be. [code]

matthen:

Unrolling these circles fills a triangle with base 2 π r and height r (where r is the radius of the filled disk). Such a triangle has area π r². This does not serve as a complete proof for why this is the area of a circle, but can give you some intuition for why it should be. [code]

explore-blog:

This 1911 photo of Marie Curie in a roomful of dudes (including Max Planck, Henri Poincaré, Ernest Rutherford, and young Albert Einstein, lurking in the background, second from right) bespeaks so much both about the gendered state of science and about the enormity of cultural bias Curie overcame to become the “Martyr of Science,” the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, and the only person to date to win a Nobel in two different sciences.
Also see Curie on science and wonder. 

explore-blog:

This 1911 photo of Marie Curie in a roomful of dudes (including Max Planck, Henri Poincaré, Ernest Rutherford, and young Albert Einstein, lurking in the background, second from right) bespeaks so much both about the gendered state of science and about the enormity of cultural bias Curie overcame to become the “Martyr of Science,” the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, and the only person to date to win a Nobel in two different sciences.

Also see Curie on science and wonder

itscarororo:

comedycentral:

Click here for more of Jon Stewart’s coverage of the recent House Committee on Science, Space and Technology hearing.

I WAS WAITING FOR THIS GIFTSET AND HERE IT IS

explore-blog:

Charming visualization from this altogether delightful children’s book about space – an imaginative and illuminating primer on the cosmos to spark awe in the souls of budding Sagans. 

explore-blog:

Charming visualization from this altogether delightful children’s book about space – an imaginative and illuminating primer on the cosmos to spark awe in the souls of budding Sagans. 

scishow:

Curiosity’s Sequel, and the Key to Finding Alien Life

SciShow Space News shares the latest developments from around the universe, including the Curiosity’s arrival at its final destination, and new insights into what clues we should really be looking for in our search for alien life.