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Quantumaniac is where it’s at - and by ‘it’ I mean awesome.

Over here, I post a ton of astronomy / math / general science in an attempt to make your brain feel good. My aim is to be as informative as possible, while posting fascinating things that hopefully enlighten us both a little to the mysteries of our truly wondrous universe(s?). Plus, how would you know if the blog exists or not unless you observe it?

Boom, just pulled the Schrödinger’s cat card. Now you have to check it out - trust me, it said so in an equation somewhere.

Also, please check out my web design company - O8 Labs

Follow Tyler Simko on Quora

 

spaceplasma:

Planets of Our Solar System

Our solar system officially has eight planets and one star: the Sun. The discovery of an object larger than Pluto in 2005 rekindled the debate over whether such objects, belonging to the Kuiper Belt – a collection of icy bodies located beyond Neptune – should be called planets. Pluto and other large members of the Kuiper Belt are now considered “dwarf planets.”

Planet facts: space-facts.com

trynottodrown:

Skulls of Marine Mammals (L to R)

  1. Bottlenose Dolphin - Tursiops truncatus
  2. Orca - Orcinus orca
  3. Dugong - Dugong Dugon
  4. West Indian Manatee - Trichechus manatus
  5. Steller’s Sea Cow - Hydromalis gigas
  6. Dwarf Sperm Whale - Kogia sima
  7. California Sea Lion - Zalophus californiaus
  8. Hooker’s Sea Lion- Phocarctos hookeri
  9. Minke Whale - Balaenoptera acutorostrata
  10. Crab Eater Seal - Lobodon carinophagus

quantumaniac:

O8 Labs

Hey guys - a few of you have wondered why I’ve been posting less often lately, and I can finally answer!

For the past few months, I’ve been working on building a new web development company, O8 Labs. We build websites, design logos, launch marketing / rebranding campaigns, and much more importantly, we even have a science pun in our name: the slogan is “Breathing life into web development,” and our name comes from Oxygen’s atomic numberWhoa, this guy must really love science, you must be thinking - and you’d be right. 

If you or anyone you know needs a:

  • personal website
  • portfolio
  • business website
  • logo design
  • marketing campaign
  • social media design
  • or really anything else web-related!

Feel free to reach out to me at tyler@o8labs.com for a quote!

Please reblog this to spread the word, and remember us anytime you or someone you know may be in need of our services. Thanks so much guys, and in the meantime, check out our website and follow us on Twitter

Please check this out and spread the word - thank you! :)

Formerly Unknown Mathematics Professor Receives “Genius Grant”

The MacArthur Fellows Program, commonly known as the “Genius Grant” just announced their recipients for 2014. As always, they are extremely impressive experts at the top of their respective fields - but for me, one in particular stuck out.

The Simons Foundations starts telling the story like this: 

On April 17, a paper arrived in the inbox of Annals of Mathematics, one of the discipline’s preeminent journals. Written by a mathematician virtually unknown to the experts in his field — a 50-something lecturer at the University of New Hampshire named Yitang Zhang — the paper claimed to have taken a huge step forward in understanding one of mathematics’ oldest problems, the twin primes conjecture.

Unknown ‘experts’ are always making similarly large claims to prestigious institutions, but this paper was different. The reception Zhang received was incredible: “The main results are of the first rank,” the author had proved “a landmark theorem in the distribution of prime numbers.”

Zhang was a researcher that no one seemed to know, his talents had been overlooked his entire career: “after he earned his doctorate in 1991 that he had found it difficult to get an academic job, working for several years as an accountant and even in a Subway sandwich shop.”

“Basically, no one knows him,” said Andrew Granville, a number theorist at the Université de Montréal. “Now, suddenly, he has proved one of the great results in the history of number theory.”

Read more about Zhang’s incredible discovery here and here.  

Follow Quantumaniac on Twitter

archatlas:

Saltscapes San Francisco Bay  Cris Benton

Benton’s images allow us to slip our earthly bonds and see the world from new heights, his aerial views offering a fresh perspective on familiar landscapes. Surprising and sublime, Saltscapes can be enjoyed equally as a collection of art photography and a portrait of ecological transformation and resilience.”

archiemcphee:

We see clouds so often that it’s easy to forget how amazing they are. Thankfully German astronaut and geophysicist Alexander Gerst is currently aboard the International Space Station where he often spends his free time taking countless extraordinary photos of the Earth as it’s whizzing by 205 miles below.

Gerst is particularly fond of photographing dramatic shadows cast by cloud formations - something that we cannot see down here on Earth. These stunning photos remind how awesome clouds are as they cast shadows that stretch for thousands of miles across the planet’s surface. Shadows so long that they eventually disappear into the black horizon.

Follow Alexander Gerst’s Twitter feed for new photos shared daily.

[via Colossal]

The fewer the facts, the stronger the opinion.

Arnold H. Glasow (1905-1998)

scienceisbeauty:

Light Printing

We are exploring new modalities of creative photography through robotics and long-exposure photography. Using a robotic arm, a light source is carried through precise movements in front of a camera. Photographic compositions are recorded as images of volumetric light. Robotic light “painting” can also be inverted: the camera is moved via the arm to create an image “painted” with environmental light. Finally, adding real-time sensor input to the moving arm and programming it to explore the physical space around objects can reveal immaterial fields like radio waves, magnetic fields, and heat flows.

Via Mediated Matter (MIT)

thedotisblack:

rays of color series i, 20142014.8.12_22.33.12_frame_0006made with processingLike it? Visit thedotisblack

thedotisblack:

rays of color series i, 2014
2014.8.12_22.33.12_frame_0006
made with processing

Like it? Visit thedotisblack